Illustrated Articles

Treatment

  • Cephalexin (brand names Rilexine®, Keflex®, Vetolexin®) is an oral antibiotic used to treat pyoderma and other bacterial skin infections in dogs and is used off-label in cats to treat pyoderma and other types of skin infections. It is sometimes used off-label to treat urinary tract infections in cats and dogs. Side effects of cephalexin are rare and usually mild.

  • Cetirizine is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat and prevent pruritus (itching) associated with atopic dermatitis, urticaria (hives), and insect bite reactions in cats and dogs. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include vomiting and increased salivation. Do not use it in pets that are allergic to it or hydroxyzine. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Corneal dystrophy is a term used to describe several conditions that occur in dogs and cause the corneas to become opaque. There are three major categories of corneal dystrophy: epithelial, stromal, and endothelial. Each is named by the anatomic location of the abnormal tissue and opacity.

  • This handout discusses the use of cryosurgery in pets. This technique involves the use of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissues. A short discussion in included as to how the technique is used, and in what circumstances it may be appropriate to use.

  • Treatment for Cushing’s disease using mitotane involves two phases: initiating phase and maintenance phase. Monitoring your dog’s food and water intake is very important. This handout provides detailed treatment instructions for dogs prescribed mitotane. Follow your veterinarian’s instructions carefully and report changes in your dog’s behavior to your veterinarian.

  • Treatment for aggression toward unfamiliar dogs is available, and the outcome can be positive. An accurate medical and behavioral assessment is needed as treatment plans are designed based on the context and underlying motivation for the behavior. To start, management is used to prevent aggressive encounters. Behavior modification is always needed and may include desensitization, counterconditioning, and response substitution. Medication is sometimes used to lower anxiety and frustration.

  • Elizabethan collars are designed to help prevent self-mutilation and as a supplementary therapy for feather-destructive birds. Collars may be designed and made by the staff at the veterinary hospital/clinic or commercially made. Collars should only be used when prescribed by an avian veterinarian. Collars are not always safe for every bird.

  • An E-collar or cone may be needed after your cat has surgery or if she has a wound. Your cat should wear the E-collar following the directions provided by your veterinarian. You may need to make a few adjustments in your home to ensure your cat does not get stuck in confined spaces. Also, you may need to adjust her feeding station to assist with her eating habits.

  • Feline eosinophilic keratitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the cornea that results in the surface of the eye appearing pink, white, or chalky. It is caused by an accumulation of inflammatory cells called eosinophils. The clinical signs, appearance, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition are explained in this handout.

  • Many liquid potpourri products and essential oils, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang, are poisonous to cats. Both ingestion and skin exposure can be toxic.